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Catatonic symptoms and autism

“Catatonic symptoms are more prevalent in young people with autism than previously thought” said an article recently published by Breen and Hare. Continuing a research theme of at least one of the authors, the idea that catatonic symptoms – primarily manifesting as stupor, unresponsiveness to light, noise or touch, mutism, etc – might be over-represented […]

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Using Discourse Analysis to Assess Cognitive Decline

Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and other dementias are progressive neurodegenerative conditions that unfold over time. Subtle symptoms such as forgetfulness and word finding problems may progress to mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and then escalate to full-blown dementia. Recent efforts to classify prodromal states have included automated analysis of spontaneous… Berisha V, Wang S, LaCross A, & […]

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Social interaction and autism: it takes two to tango

Noah Sasson and colleagues have published their findings suggesting advocating “for a broader perspective of social difficulties in ASD (autism spectrum disorder) that considers both the individual’s impairments and the biases of potential social partners.” In other words, it takes two to (socially, interactively) tango. I might add that a doctoral thesis by one of the […]

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Changing your name after marrying, bias at home and  work, and smart-phone blindness

It’s time again for another combination post featuring fascinating tidbits you may have missed were it not for our eagle eyes and constant efforts to keep you informed. And yes, we’ll start at the end since we know you are wondering if smart-phone blindness is really a thing. Would we steer you wrong? Smart-phone blindness […]

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Why does music training increase intelligence?

We know that music training causes intelligence to increase, but why? In this post I 1) propose a new theory, and 2) falsify it immediately. Given that this particular combination of activities is unpublishable in any academic journal, I invite you to read the whole story here (in under 500 words). 1) Proposing the ISAML Incredible but […]

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Personality Psychology

Does Your View of Happiness Shape Your Empathy?

Empathy has gone mainstream. Now more than ever, parents and teachers are trying to foster empathy in kids, and citizens are advocating for a society and for leaders who are more empathic. But why are some people more empathic than others, and what is the best way to cultivate empathy? Being empathic means being able […]

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12 Positive Psychology Interventions + 3 Ways To Find The One You Need

Positive Psychological Interventions (also known as Positive Psychology Interventions-PPIs) are theoretically-grounded and empirically-validated instructions, activities, and recommendations that are designed to enhance wellbeing (Lomas, Hefferon & Ivtzan, 2014). Moreover, PPIs focus on using positive emotions and strengths to achieve and/or boost wellbeing. Numerous research projects have shown that concentration on positive characters and strengths are […]

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Positive Psychology Coaching and Life Coaching: How Do They Differ?

If you’ve ever asked yourself how positive psychology and life coaching differ, you’re definitely not alone. The surface level definitions don’t really do a great job of distinguishing these 2 very different approaches towards well-being. However, what’s even more surprising than their marked differences is how powerful positive psychology and life coaching are when used in […]

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“Dominance” Training Deprives Dogs of Positive Experiences

Dominance is an outdated approach to dog training – and it also means dogs miss out on fun. Approaches to dog training based on dominance rely on the idea that you have to be the ‘alpha’ or pack leader. Unfortunately, this type of dog training is not just out-of-date and potentially risky, but modern approaches […]

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Tell it to the judge 

Anyone who has been in court more than a few times, has likely heard a judge “rehabilitate” a potential juror who has expressed bias by asking the juror if they will, in judging “this case”, be “fair, impartial and unbiased”. Why yes, your Honor (say almost all of them). Mykol Hamilton and Kate Zephyrhawke, researchers, […]