Do twitter or facebook activity influence scientific impact?

Are scientists smart when they promote their work on social media? Isn’t this a waste of time, time which could better be spent in the lab running experiments? No. An analysis of all available articles published by PLoS journals suggests otherwise. My own twitter activity might best be thought of as learning about science (in […]

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Suffering May Lead to Extreme Political Beliefs

Many reasons have been offered for the increasing polarization of political attitudes. Now, a new study uncovers a different, more personal catalyst for moving to the far left or right. It finds people who have experienced significant adversity in their lives are more likely to gravitate toward an extreme spot on the ideological spectrum. This […]

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How Adults Communicate Bias to Children

In a rapidly diversifying society, it’s more important than ever for kids to learn how to get along with people who are different from themselves. But what if we adults are inadvertently making kids prejudiced? That’s the question raised by a new study from the University of Washington. The results suggest that negative biases can […]

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Lower Social Status Causes Less Social Contact and More Depression in Uni Students

A person’s subjective social status reflects how they rank themselves relative to others in their community. Social status can be considered to be a psychological dimension of social class and socioeconomic status, and it has been shown to be positively related to mental health: The higher one’s perceived social status, the better one’s mental health. […]

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Older Women, Deeper Learning, and Greater Satisfaction at University

“The ‘ideal learner’, from an institutional view, is young, well-resourced and not bound by conflicting family obligations” (Mallman & Lee, 2014, p. 3). However, some recent research published in the Journal of Diversity in Higher Education challenges this view. If we consider “ideal learners” to be active, independent, critical, and inquisitive students who go beyond […]

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Mates Make Groups for Individualists But Not for Collectivists

Humans are an incredibly groupy type of animal. We form psychologically-meaningful groups based on our gender, age, nationality, religion, politics, skin colour, occupation, sexual inclination, and sports teams, to name just a few. Even in the artificial environment of psychology labs, people will identify with groups based on their totally random allocation to “Group A.” […]

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Does Warmer Weather Really Make You Happier?

Now that warmer weather is here, people assume greater happiness and new love will follow. However, the data indicate many of these assumptions are iffy and often simply wrong. Read More… Author: Allen R McConnell Ph.D.

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Hugs and Warm Touches Benefit Health and Well-Being

Need a hug? Research shows positive interpersonal touching fights illness, increases happiness and well-being, and supports social connectedness with others. Read More… Author: Allen R McConnell Ph.D.

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Social Psychology

Social Psychology

In some ways, all psychology is social psychology because all psychological areas of study exist within a social context. However, there is a distinct field of social psychology that exists alongside other approaches, such as developmental or cognitive psychology.   Gordon Allport (1968) perhaps puts it best when he describes social psychology as the study of […]

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social psychology research topics

Social Psychology Research Topics

Whether you’re looking for social psychology research topics for your A-Level or AP Psychology class, or considering a research question to explore for your Psychology PhD, the Psychology Unlocked list of social psychology research topics provides you with a strong list of possible avenues to explore. Where possible we include links to university departments seeking PhD applications […]

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